AdviceIQ Articles

  • Your Car Crash’s Costs (Pt.2)

    Our first article looked at some of the immediate aftermath of your car accident, from the busted glass to your busted heart over a crash involving your old wheeled buddy. The good news is that, if your car isn’t totaled, your insurance company pays to fix it– if you know your options and negotiate smart.

  • Estate Plans for Gen Y?

    Dying is really difficult to think about when you’re young and just revving up the best years of your life. But think: What would happen to your assets? To your family or loved ones? Estate planning looms large even for millennials.

    If you were born between 1980 and 2000, consider this topic from a new perspective: Estate planning isn’t about expecting the worst. It’s about protecting the people you care about and making sure the assets you work hard to earn eventually disperse in a way you approve, no matter what.

  • Why Is October Bad for Stocks?

    Historically, October is the weakest period for stocks, which we have witnessed firsthand, yet again. The huge crashes of 1929 and 1987 happened during the 10th month. Why? There are several reasons, ranging from regularly occurring events to plain bad luck that for some reason lands this month.

  • 401(k): Safety in Allocation

    Peaks and valleys of the market probably give you fits about your investments in retirement savings accounts. Nobody can tell when Wall Street’s ups will peak and its lows bottom out, but you can protect yourself with patience and a cool head.

  • Social Security Payout Shrinks

    Calculating Social Security retirement benefits can be tricky. If you worked in a government job and did not pay Social Security taxes, part of your civil service pension gets deducted from your Social Security benefits, an offset called the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP). What you may not know is that the WEP’s effect goes beyond that – this provision also brings down your spouse’s and other dependents’ benefits.

  • A Strong Dollar’s Impact

    Among all the ebb and flow of financial news, what is important and what isn’t? Definitely important: the dollar’s rise. This doesn’t easily lend itself to TV visuals, but it should have a big impact on investors.

  • Save or Pay Student Loans?

    If you recently graduated from college and landed a good job, congratulations. You may face a dilemma: Begin saving for your future or pay off student debt now?

    Of course, avoid missing payments on your loans and at least meet your monthly minimums. The big question depends on whether your income exceeds your monthly expenses (including your minimum payments). How do you best put that money to work?

  • Investing to Cut Taxes

    After the headline risks of the market and inflation, taxes present the biggest obstacle to your building wealth. Your best investment strategy seeks to not only generate returns on your capital but also to save as much of your money as possible to keep it working for you. One of the surest ways to preserve your capital: Reduce your taxes on investment income and gains.

    Here are some strategies.

  • Misguided 401(k) Asset Mixes

    People often have lousy asset allocation in their retirement plans. Overdone risk avoidance and other behavioral tics combine to ensure they probably will not create the wealth they need to retire comfortably.

    Here is a conversation I've had too many times: An acquaintance says proudly that he invests the maximum into his 401(k). I ask what allocation he's made between equities and bonds. He says he just divides his contributions equally among the four investment choices the plan offers. I cringe.

  • Saving for a Down Payment

    If you are financially ready to be a home owner, now the most critical piece of the puzzle is the down payment. Coming up with enough cash for it is the biggest challenge of home buying. So once your finances are in order, it’s time to focus on saving.

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