AdviceIQ Articles

  • Checking Your Advisor

    If you’re one of the some 10,000 people turning 65 every day for the next 15 years, your looming retirement probably spurs you to seek out a financial advisor to help with money decisions as you leave the workforce. Everywhere you see professionals with strings of letters after their names. How do you find the right advisor with the right credentials for you?

  • Curbing Taxes on Inheritances

    Inheriting appreciated assets from your deceased spouse can bring a host of financial complications at the time of life when you already have too much on your mind. Here’s the math to know how to be prepared – and maybe save on taxes.

  • Can’t Trust the Stock Market?

    If you keep your life savings in certificates of deposit or a savings account at your local bank, that decision may be based on a common belief about finances, known as a money script: “You can’t trust the stock market.” This belief about money can keep you from making the most of your retirement savings.

  • Estate Planning: The Heirs

    The murkiest part of estate planning is to discuss when and how to distribute your assets to your heirs. This process requires a series of considerations and trade-offs to avoid emotion-laden family problems.

    Up to now in our series of articles we focused on numbers, which are objective and straightforward. But when it comes to this final set of issues, things get gray because emotional factors drive decisions now. There is no correct answer on how to distribute your estate.

  • Grow Savings or Trim Debt?

    If you’re like most young adults, you juggle many financial priorities at once. With only so much cash to go around each month, how do you know what to put at the top of your money list? Should you build a nest egg or pay off debt?

    Most personal financial advice focuses on one or the other but doesn’t explain how to decide if you want to accomplish both. Here’s what to consider:

    Take stock of your savings. The size of your savings plays a big role in deciding whether to sock away more or whittle your debt.

  • How to Get a Decent Return

    What kind of a portfolio return can you reasonably hope for? My goal, as an advisor, is to average 8.5% yearly. While no return is guaranteed, how can an investor reasonably hope to attain that performance?

  • Bad Decisions in Old Age

    What if you lose your mental capacity in later years and make irrational financial choices? How can you safeguard your assets from that threat?

    After three decades as a financial planner, I see more and more clients reach, not just retirement, but their final years. An issue that becomes especially important at this stage of life is how to protect your financial resources from an unexpected threat – yourself.

  • Estate Planning: Dividing It

    When you die, who gets your money? Your kids, you’d think. But before the money reaches your heirs, the government and creditors take their share first.

    Now that you know the estimated amount you have to give, most of the math is over. The rest of the calculations have to do with who gets what proportion of your assets.

  • Ebola, Fear and Market Timing

    The West African Ebola outbreak this summer generated fear and anxiety, particularly when two infected American aid volunteers were treated at Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital. What does Ebola have to do with your personal investment policy and meeting your goals? Plenty: It provides a useful lesson in the psychology of fear.

  • Sizing Up Your 401(k)

    When did you last evaluate your company’s retirement plan? If you’re like many people, your 401(k) or profit-sharing plan constitutes the largest – or at least one of the largest – investment accounts in your portfolio. Here’s how to make sure it’s the best plan for you.

    Many factors help you evaluate your plan, including the total expenses, investment options, guidance provided and your company match.

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