AdviceIQ Articles

  • Getting Investing Discipline

    Saving money is like exercising. Often when people start saving late in life, just like in exercising, they try to do too much too fast. When that happens, pain is often the result, and they quit.

    When saving money, if you put away too much too fast and it hurts your lifestyle, you likely stop saving. In both situations, your health (financial and physical) is worsened.

  • Fed’s Murky Rate Language

    The word for today is “considerable,” as in the Federal Reserve’s recurring statement that interest rates will remain low for “a considerable time.” But how long is “a considerable time”? The deliberate murkiness of this phrase, like much else the central bank says, is maddening.

  • Protecting Inherited IRAs

    Your own individual retirement account is generally exempt from the reach of creditors, but an inherited account may not be. If you plan to pass on an IRA to heirs, read on to learn how to better safeguard the money.

  • Unlearning Investment Fears

    Growing up with their parents’ scary tales of Depression hardship, the generation now approaching retirement age grew up to be wary of investing and owning debts. This means missing out on returns and losing the value of savings to inflation.

    The squirrels brought this lesson home for me. Like many others in suburbia, my wife and I had a squirrel problem. We tried various things to keep the creatures out of our garbage cans, with no success. They ate through the covers. Even after we built a wooden shed to house the garbage cans, they got in there, as well.

  • How to Spot Short-Term-ism

    Do we live in a nation of short-term thinkers? Business has plenty of examples that seem to prove that assertion. Think of how Blackberry frittered away its lead in smartphones. Fortunately, there are plenty of successes to give us heart. How can you spot the difference? Look at company leaders.

  • An Advisor for Everyone

    There are many different financial advisors catering to different kinds of investors, including those with few assets, which may surprise some people.

    At a panel of advisors, they discussed the different compensation models to choose from – some charge one-time fees for a financial plan (that often appeals to the self-directed-investing-leaning individual); others charge fees based on assets, typically 1% yearly; and some charge commissions for individual transactions.

  • Is Alternative Investing OK?

    Once only available to institutions and wealthy individuals, alternative investments – basically securities that do not trade on any exchange – are winning a broader appeal, according to a panel of advisors.

    The goal of using alternative investments is to diversify a portfolio or to lessen its risk. These vehicles tend to be illiquid, meaning they are difficult to trade. They can only be sold to others via financial institutions.

  • How to Avoid Financial Scams

    It’s easy for investors to become a con artist’s mark, according to financial advisors. Many of the victims scammed in Bernie Madoff’s $65 billion Ponzi scheme were sophisticated at investing. Very sophisticated. One such person – a former trader – invested because he played basketball with Madoff’s accountant.

    If successful people are prone to invest in fraudulent private companies, what is the common investor to do? Is there any hope for the average person to invest in private companies and not be ripped off? Here are some tips and red flags to look for before investing.

  • The Advisor Team Approach

    The do-it-all professional who plans your financial future appears as quaint – and rare – these days as the old country doctor who cured all ills. Today’s good advisors can help you sort out your myriad money details by tapping a network of experts in law, estate planning, taxes, insurance and other fields.

  • How to Afford Retirement

    The methods of building a secure retirement income, which include wise use of Social Security and amassing sufficient savings, are complex. A smart financial planner can help you do it, according to a panel of advisors.

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